Lea Cohen | Brookline Real Estate, Newton Real Estate, West Roxbury Real Estate


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Whether you’re moving down the street or to a different state, it’s important to make sure your pets are prepared for this change. There are several practical things to consider while getting your pets ready for your move. Since you already have a lot to keep track of between packing and planning for moving day, keep the following tips handy to ensure that your pets are fully prepared.

Stock Up on Supplies Before Moving Day

Making sure you have plenty of food for your pets means you’ll have one less thing to worry about on moving day. Plan to purchase enough food to last for at least a couple of weeks after you arrive. If your pets take any medication, ask your vet about stocking enough of it to last for a few extra weeks.

Update Microchip Information and ID Tags

Pets can easily become stressed during a move. With unfamiliar people coming into and out of your home to load or unload the truck, there’a a higher risk of having anxious pets bolt out the door. Before moving day, update the information associated with your pets’ microchips and ID tags in case they get lost.

Stay Current on Vaccines

Making sure your pets have updated vaccines can give you peace of mind if they happen to run off during the transition into your new space. Being updated on vaccines is also helpful if you plan on boarding your pets on moving day. Boarding them may help prevent them from getting lost or feeling overwhelmed.

Visit Your New Home Before Moving Day

If possible, bring your pets over to your new home before you move in. Keep dogs on a leash to make sure they stay safe, and bring cats in carriers that you can easily get them in and out of. Bringing them over before moving day can give them a chance to wander around and explore each room while your new home is empty and quiet. 

Tire Your Pets Out

Tired pets are less likely to act up if they’re feeling stressed or anxious as moving day approaches. In the days before your departure, spend quality time with your pets and keep them active. Run around the yard with your dogs, bring them to the local dog park or take them for extra long walks around the neighborhood. Use toys to keep your cats active and playful. Spending some time with your pets every day can help them feel less anxious about the changes going on around them, such as having boxes all around instead of familiar items. 


Moving to a new home is difficult for everyone. Children, pets, not even you are immune to the stresses of adjusting to a new life. But moving can also be a great experience. They can help a family grow closer together, discover new interests and hobbies, and create new memories together.

In this article, we’re going to give you some moving tips that will help you and your family make the most of your decision to relocate, and maybe give you a new optimism to endure the stressful process of moving.

Making a move easier on your pets

When our pets are sick or upset it can be heartbreaking for us. We can’t use our words to explain that everything will be okay. Generally, pets are resilient and can often adapt easily to a new environment. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to help make it easier for them.

To introduce your pet to their new home, take them for a visit before the move, if possible. Let them sniff around for a while and get comfortable with the place, assuring them that there is no danger there.

On moving day, have your pet stay with a relative or pet-sitter for the day so they don’t get lost or trampled on during the hectic moving process.

Once you’re all moved in, let your pet explore the new home freely, making sure their toys, bedding, or litter box are all within their reach.

Helping kids cope with a move

A move can be particularly stressful for children. Oftentimes moving homes means changing schools, leaving old friends and making new ones.

Before you even begin looking at homes, try to get your child involved in the process so they don’t feel powerless. Encourage them by showing them fun things to do in their new town, like nice parks or their favorite stores. Get them involved in planning out their new room, like how it will be painted and decorated.

In terms of school, try to time your move so that your child can make some friends before the school year begins. Plus, explain to them how easy it is to stay in touch with old friends through email, Facebook, or whatever method is appropriate for their age. Find out if there are children in your new neighborhood, or a club or sport that your child can join to help them make new friends.

Don’t neglect your own anxiety

While it’s important to help our family deal with the new move, it’s also vital to take care of our own needs. Make sure you spend time on your own interests and try to avoid isolating yourself from others during this stressful time.

If you’re starting a new job, take note of whether or not you’re bringing that stress home with you and try to set aside time for yourself to do the things you like to help you unwind. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed, be sure to reach out to your spouse, a friend, and/or a counselor.

If you and your family take the time to help each other, there’s no reason you shouldn’t have a fun move and enjoy your new home together.





While you may really love your pet, not everyone is an animal lover. If you’re planning on selling your home soon, and you have a pet, make sure that Fido doesn’t chase away potential buyers. From the damage that pets can do to potential allergies that buyers may have, a pet can be a detriment to selling your home. Heed these tips below before selling a home with pets:


Before You List Your Home, Move Your Pets


You don’t need to give up your pets in order to sell your home, but it’s a good idea to find them another place to stay while your home is on the market. This will make it easier for the open house and if other agents want to show the home to potential buyers. Dogs barking and cats creeping around may drive potential buyers away. Even the idea of pet food and a water bowl may make a potential buyer suspicious as to whether the pet has caused any sort of damage around the home. If you find a place for your pets to stay, you can eliminate a lot of these problems.


If You Can’t Send The Pets Away, Keep Them Out Of Sight


Before a home showing, be sure to clean up any pet items that are around the house including toys, food, and pet bowls. The pet can go with you while you’re out of the house for a showing. It’s not that you’re being secretive about having a pet, yet, you shouldn’t call attention to the fact that pets have been present in the home. 


Clean Your House


When you decide to sell your home, give it a deep clean. Vacuum the house up and get pet hair off of the furniture. You may even want to run an air filtration system to get dust and pet dander out of the air. This will prevent potential allergic buyers from sneezing their way through a home showing. 


Don’t forget to clean up the yard as well in this process of getting the home ready for a home showing. Any “gifts” that have been left behind by your pets should be cleaned up in the yard. You don’t want potential homebuyers ruining their shoes and their home showing experience. 


Giving your home a deep clean will also help to eliminate any pet odors that may be in the home. It’s hard for owners to pick up on these smells, as your noses become accustomed to it. Buyers can smell pets right away! Change the litter box and use some anti-odor prays to help get any of the stench from animals out of the home. Opening the windows in your home can also work wonders to change the air and the smell in the space.


Even though it might be a bit hard for your pet through the process of selling your home, with the extra revenue that you’ll make, you can get your pet their very own luxury space!


Pets are a part of the family. When we welcome a new dog into the home, we often expect them to meet our standards of behavior without much guidance. Dogs, like children, require consistent training from all members of the family. They need positive reinforcement and clear signals from you to teach them what behavior is acceptable.

In this article, we’re going to cover some important house training tips for you and your canine companion. We’ll look at some of the common mistakes that new pet owners make, and talk about ways to curb undesirable behavior like chewing shoes or furniture or barking at windows.


Traits vs. behaviors

One common mistake new pet owners make is to attempt to place character traits on their dog. Words like pushy, protective, mischievous, etc. are all adjectives that we often use to describe our dogs.

However, as dog owners and home owners, our energy is better spent on recognizing and correcting behaviors. If your dog tears at a carpet or chews the corner of your sofa, it isn’t very helpful sitting around thinking of adjectives to describe your dog (like restless or anxious). Rather, we should think about the behavior itself and how to replace it.

Let’s jump right into some household behaviors and ways to replace them with desirable alternatives.

Chewing

Chewing is an important part of a dog’s life. Chewing itself is not a negative behavior, but when your dog starts demolishing furniture or eating your homework, it’s time to take steps to curb this behavior.

First, make sure your dog is eating a healthy diet and getting enough exercise. Dogs who aren’t eating a fat and protein rich food or who are overeating are prone to having excessive energy. If they’re trapped indoors and have nothing to focus that energy on, they’ll turn to chewing things they aren’t supposed to.

To focus your dog’s energy on positive behaviors, take your dog for a walk, jog, or play with them. If you notice your dog attempting to chew things they shouldn’t be, draw their attention away and provide them with a better alternative.

Barking

Just like chewing, barking is not in itself a negative behavior. It’s when your dog barks excessively and inappropriately that it becomes problematic.

Dogs bark for several reasons: to get you to play, to show that they’re stressed or bored, and so on. If your dog spends a lot of time monitoring doors and windows and barking at passersby, there are a few things you can do to curb the behavior.

First, take away the trigger. In this case, that could be closing the curtains or restricting your dog’s access to the room. If your dog is worried about strangers passing by the house, they are likely already too tense to begin training an alternative behavior to barking. If it’s noises that alarm your dog, try playing soft music to mask the noises for a day or two.

Once you’re ready to start training, have someone walk past outside where your dog can see from the window or make a noticeable noise outside. Reward your dog with treats when they do not react until they become more comfortable with the outside distractions.




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